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development

Hi guys, this time I’ll write about the new Android Wear, which was announced last week. So what is it all about?

Its a new approach by Google to bring a new concept by creating a new development area with targeting only wearable devices.

It’s not a completely new OS, its the same android but made specifically for wearable device software development.

‘Google Says that the Android Extends to Android Wear. Richer Experience for the Wearable devices’ -


So this time, there are 2 types of designs unlike the galaxy gear and smart watch 1 and 2. You can see a circle one and a traditional square screen. As I have heard the square one is going to be manufactured by LG, which has less spec and smaller price tag, whereas the circle one will be made by Motorola with high specs.

For developers, Android wear SDK developer preview has been released, so you guys can download and try it out. Which will be a great experience in the future when the device is out in the market.

So with the help of the official article I managed to find out that you can do the below shown basic functionality.

functionalities

It does not mean that you have to learn anything new, you also can use the old APIs

‘You can also trigger your notifications contextually using existing Android APIs. For example, use geofences to provide glance able information to your users when they are at home, or use the activity detection APIs to send messages to your users’ wrists while they are bicycling.’

So what are you waiting for, register for developer preview, download the sdk and start developing.

:)

Reference : Android Wear|Path of a Coder.com

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Lahiru, a Java Tech lead with over 8 years of experience in enterprise software development, currently is working as a lead Android Developer at Exilesoft.

More info is accessible here.

Stay tuned with the Live Blog for detailed and Live updates.

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The Agile Software Development workshop organized by the ‘DevOps Team’ of ‘National School of Business Management’ in collaboration with ‘@99x 99X Technology‘ will be held on 6th March from 9.00AM onwards at NSBM auditorium. The NSBM ‘DevOps Team’ and ’99x Technologies’ will take you into a whole new dimension of Software Development Methodology with Agile Software Development.

Check here for info and event page.

Video Coverage:

Photo Album: here.

Hi Guys, this time I am back with some Android Game Development. I got this idea after, the popular game Flappy Bird. Hope all may have tried that game…!
Ok, so I wanted to develop a game and I did some researches and found out that there are a lot of Game engines out there. Some of them are COCOS2D, AndEngine, libGDX and many others. In this article I’ll guild you using AndEngine which is a bit easier one. In future I’ll write on libGDX.

Assumption : I assume that you guys know how to install eclipse development environment, configure java path and install Android plugin to eclipse. This post does not cover all those basic steps.

Advise : As this is a kind of a crash course, its advisable to create files the same name as I use(But it is not mandatory).

Expected Outcome : You will be able to create some lines using the AndEngine

Step 1
Download the Source(library) for the AndEngine using this link and extract

https://github.com/nicolasgramlich/AndEngine

Step 2
Create a new project and when creating select ‘Android Project from Existing Code’ and in it select the folder that we extracted in the Step1.
existing code

This is a library project. Actually this library is the ANDENGINE.
libraryproject

You can check it by right clicking on the project we created now and going to the Android tab. You can see the ‘Is Library’ check box ticked.

Step 3
Now create a new Android project and un tick the create activity. Because we are going to create AndEngine activity using the library project we created above.
createactivity

Step 4
Now you have a project with empty src folder. Right click on that folder and create a new package when naming the package use the package name available in that project ManifestFile
packagename

In my case package name is ‘”com.batz.andengsample”‘

Step 4
Now in side the empty package Download or copy the code and create LineEample.java activity using this LineExample Source Code.

You will get some errors, but don’t worry we will fix it in the next step.

Step 5
So now in your project, right click and go to Android tab and there in the below section(library section), click on the add button and select the AndEngine project and press ok. And then press Apply.
add library

Now all the errors may have gone. Some times you will have errors on the package name, if you have used your own name. So for that, click on the package name that shows as error, click ctrl key +1 key , which will bring suggestion to create a package name according to yours, and click on it to create it. And hopefully all the bugs will be fixed.

Step 6
Before going for the app launch, we have to do one more important thing, we have to specify the activity we created now in the manifest file as a launcher

So go to the manifest file and add these lines between the application tags

<activity
android:name=”.LineExample”>
<intent-filter>
<action android:name=”android.intent.action.MAIN” />
<category android:name=”android.intent.category.LAUNCHER” />
</intent-filter>
</activity>
manifest

LineExample is the name I gave for the activity we created, so in your one don’t forget to change that

Step 7
Now you are ready to run the app. So while you are in the the activity try running the app. it should bring a screen where you will see lots of random lines.

Step 8(For people getting error saying cannot find andengine.apk)
For some people the AndEngine folder is not getting added as library on the time of building the app. So at that point what you can do is copy the andengine.jar file from the AndEngine project libs folder and copy it into your projects’s libs folder. And right click on the newly added andengine.jar file and click on ‘Add to Build Path’ option. This is how the project structure looks after I added the jar to my project from the AndEngine project in the Step8

projectstructure

AndEngine Resources : http://www.andengine.org/

For people who got more time , for people who needs more detailed instruction on the same project guild please watch this tutorial video
Development Reference : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0kjiIH6u-M

Thank You
-Batz-

Reference:  – http://pathofacoder.com/2014/03/04/lets-try-android-game-development-with-andengine/

Developing many Android apps I found that a lot of methods are non-application-specific which means I can extract them into a Utils class which I can then share among various projects. One of my most useful methods is Utils.isEmulator(). This allows me to write into the app behavior which will be optimized for development in case the app is running inside an emulator supplied by an SDK and optimized for end-users in case it’s running on an actual device.

Here’s a use case example. Let’s say you’re building an alarm clock for Android and you want to test the snoozing feature. Let’s say the snooze period has a minimum length of 5 minutes. It will be a waste of time for you to wait 5 minutes every time you hit snooze when you’re actually testing this on the emulator, so why not set it to 1 in this case?

final int minutes = Utils.isEmulator() ? 1 : 5;

While developing the application yourself you’ll find many such use cases. At the moment there is no full proof, recommended way of checking whether you’re running in an emulator or not but the following implementation never failed me:

private static final boolean IS_EMULATOR = android.os.Build.MODEL.endsWith("sdk");

public static boolean isEmulator() {
return IS_EMULATOR;
}

Packaging both behaviors in the same ‘shipment’ (.apk file) is also convenient because it allows you to enable a debug/development mode when you’re helping customers or when you’re just testing functionality on real devices (e.g. simply by forcing IS_EMULATOR to be true in the implementation above in case some button is pressed). In my next process tip, I’ll share another use case for isEmulator() which isn’t application specific and which you can use in every single app you build from now on.

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‘The Google Glass Project’, a real life case study of agile practices was presented at Colombo Agile Meet up on 1st of October 2013 at Voice Lounge, Burgher Recreation Club.

The presentation commenced with Shamira Dias (Delivery Manager, Exilesoft), addressing the gathering on the topic “Unfamiliar territory and uncertain outcomes: The Google Glass Project”. He introduced the company, Exilesoft as a software development company working on different technologies and in different business domains. He reverted back to his topic by explaining the collaboration gap and agile practices that Exilesoft used to overcome these hurdles. He introduced the Google glass project as the best example for unfamiliar territory and uncertain outcomes projects and explained the case study by introducing the Google Glass project team Shervon, Sanath and Amalan.  Further he enlightened on the agile practices (i.e. shorter sprint cycles, frequent demos, always working software and good infrastructure (unit testing, continuous integration)) that helped them to reach the project goals.

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Subsequently the talk was passed onto Sanath Nandasiri (Software Engineer, Exilesoft) one of the developers, in the ongoing Google Glass project. He explained what Google Glass is, what it is capable of and its available features. A live Google Glass Demonstration was the highlight of the evening. One of the important features was, it runs Android 4.0.4 and it got a wonderful natural voice recognition which has a high accuracy rate.

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Further on Sanath moved into Google Glass development. There are two ways that we can approach the GLASS development. Namely the native way (Android) and by using Glassware development (Server Side using Mirror API). He proceeded to explained how the glassware works, what the role of the Mirror API is and the technologies used to develop a Glassware. Native development is similar to the traditional android development but with some restriction of functionality and libraries. One of the reasons for the restriction is caused by the lack of sensors in Google GLASS unlike normal Android phone. Those functions can be achieved by pairing your Android phone through Bluetooth. It was also explained how the glassware authentication takes place under the hood.

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The next round of demo sessions explained in detail the Google GLASS Time line. Sanath demonstrated application of Google Glass to an Android phone running Android 4.0.4 or a later version, this he explained to be a great emulator to test your Glassware apps (however it may not be used to test native apps).

Finally Dulan Bandara (Senior Software Engineer, Exilesoft), elaborated on unit testing and its importance in an unfamiliar territory with uncertain outcomes. He further explained the implementation of unit testing in the Google glass project.  A comparison of unit testing on Android and unit testing on Google Glass was followed by a hands-on coding demo for the unit testing.

Volunteers from the audience were given the opportunity to experience the Google Glass. The presentation concluded with the Introduction of a new meet up group “Colombo Mobile Meetup”, and an Announcement of the upcoming Dev Day 2013.

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Following the immense success and popularity of RoboFest in 2012, the Faculty of Computing of the Sri Lanka Institute of Information Technology (SLIIT) will conduct CODEFEST for the second consecutive time this year.
CodeFest is a nationwide software competition which aims to harness student talent and aid in the software development sector in Sri Lanka. SLIIT seeks to contribute towards propelling the country to become a knowledge hub by conducting competitions of this nature.
The competition, open to secondary school and tertiary level students, will be held on 25 October 2013, with a mini hackathon and quiz competition running parallel to the grand finale. Participants are required to develop an interactive system to assist students to interact with and improve knowledge on any subject to meet defined learning outcomes.
Criteria for the secondary school category will involve a quiz competition which will be held during workshops for the school teams, during which teams will be asked questions based on the ICT syllabus. The 10 best teams will be selected for the second round, and after an elimination round the best five teams will be selected for the grand finale. The top three teams will receive awards and valuable cash prizes of Rs. 80,000, Rs. 60,000 and Rs. 40,000. Furthermore, two other awards will be given to the teams that produce the most innovative and creative software.
The tertiary category encompasses a software competition and mini hackathon. This competition is open to students from any higher education institute in Sri Lanka, including universities. Contestants are expected to develop a context-aware mobile application that supports the current needs of Sri Lankan society.
Categories of applications could possibly include, but are not limited to the following focus areas – solutions targeting travel, education, health, environment, social harmony and development activities. The application context can be a geographical location, environmental conditions or a suitable location to use the application.
Innovative forms of locations-based applications and context-sensitive applications beneficial to the progress of the country are encouraged. The top three teams of the competition will be awarded cash prizes worth Rs. 50,000, Rs. 30,000 and Rs. 20,000. Similar to the school category, two awards will be given to the teams that produce software which showcase innovation and creativity.
Teams for both the school and tertiary level categories may comprise up to five members. However, all members of a team must be from the same school or university. There can be multiple teams from the same school or university, but one student cannot represent more than one team.
The mini hackathon will be held at SLIIT Malabe Campus parallel to the finale of CodeFest. A product specification of a mash-up application for a simple real life requirement would be presented at the onset of the challenge. For the mini hackathon, student teams from both universities and schools will compete with each other to prove their aptitude for software development. These teams may comprise up to five members. Teams participating in the Hackathon are required to hack together a piece of working software within six hours using any technology. The winning team will be awarded a valuable cash prize. “CodeFest 2013 is part of SLIIT’s CSR project which seeks to enhance and enrich students’ knowledge of IT while leveraging the power of IT across the island,” stated Professor S. Karunaratne, Chairman of SLIIT.
“This competition is an ideal platform to promote the application of skills honed from ICT-related modules taught in schools and with undergraduate studies towards problem solving skills and related areas,” noted Professor Lalith Gamage, President and CEO of SLIIT. “Participation in the competition provides an opportunity to compete with peers from around the country, sharing real competitive experiences, making new connections and, above all, showcasing talents and innovations.” To support the potential participants of CodeFest, SLIIT will conduct a series of IT seminars in collaboration with the Ministry of Education. These seminars will be held at 10 centres island-wide, covering most of the provinces in Sri Lanka. The seminar series will assist school children to enhance existing knowledge of ICT and emerging technologies while providing them an opportunity to share knowledge.
The first round of the CodeFest competition will be held on 20 September 2013 at SLIIT’s Malabe campus, with the grand finale to be held on 25 October 2013. Registration forms can be downloaded from the website http:/www.CodeFest.lk/. Applicants must complete the form and return it to Indraka Udayakumara, Coordinator – CODEFEST 2013 either through post (Faculty of Computing at SLIIT – New Kandy Road, Malabe) or email (CodeFest@sliit.lk).

Source: DailyFT